​I decided

I got a $200 fine. I pulled up in the wrong spot to pick people up. It was 2 am and the parking inspector waved me down.

He took a photo of my number plate and stuck his head in the window.

You’ll be receiving a fine in the mail.

What for?

You’re not allowed to stop in a bus zone.

But I had to pick up passengers.

You’re not allowed to stop in a bus zone.

I turned my head away.

Thank you.

I wound up the window and drove off. My passengers were sorry. It wasn’t their fault. I stopped in a bus zone. I broke the law. When I got home I checked the bus timetable. Buses don’t run after midnight. According to the app I picked my passengers up at 2:03 am. It didn’t matter. The fine still came through. I paid it and decided.

I decided I wasn’t going to drive Uber anymore. The previous 7-months I’d been studying machine learning and deep learning online. It was time to get a job in the field.

Uber was my only source of income. But I decided. I decided I wasn’t going to drive Uber anymore.

The end of that week I got a message on LinkedIn saying I should meet with Mike. I met Mike and he said I should meet with Cam. I met Cam on the Monday and Cam asked if I wanted to come in on Thursday. I went in on Thursday and then again the next Thursday, the week after I was offered a job.

I said yes.

Deciding is different to wishing. Wishing leaves you in two minds (or more). Part of you keeps doing what you’ve always done while the other part wishes of something different. When you spread your attention across too many things it doesn’t work very well.

Deciding draws a line in the sand. A line which says, after this point things are going to be different.

If you want something, you first have to decide if you want it.

Then once you make the decision, stick with it. And if you have to change it, decide again. Each time a change, each time a decision.